Students meeting with a career advisor

Employers

Recruit the best from Coe College! Our connections are YOUR connections!

Join Handshake, an online relational database system designed to connect Coe College students, alumni and employers during their internship or job search process. The system allows students to upload resumes/cover letters, search and apply for internships/jobs and learn about each organization in the system. Employers can post jobs and internships, search student resumes. Students and employers will also be able to register for a Coe College Career Events (such as workshops, mock interview days, employer panels etc.).

Visit https://app.joinhandshake.com/register.
Or click here to find out How to Create a User Account, Join a Company, and Connect with Schools.

Iowa's Targeted Industries (bioscience, advanced manufacturing, and information technologies) may qualify for a grant to cover partial intern wages through the Iowa Economic Development Authority. Go here to see if your company qualifies.

Additional content:

Contact our staff to learn more:

Barb Tupper, Director - btupper@coe.edu - 319.399.8662
Carrie Bettcher, Career Advisor - cbettcher@coe.edu - 319.399.8608
Joe Demarest, Internship Specialist - jdemarest@coe.edu - 319.399.8780
Nanci Young, Career Advisor - nyoung@coe.edu - 319.399.8581


Featured Employer

Cargill-_black_2c_web_lg

Did you know that Cargill is the largest privately held corporation in the United States?

Did you also know that it was founded right here in Iowa?

In 1865 William Cargill planted the roots of the now global corporation when he bought the companies first grain flat house in Conover, Iowa (10 miles south of Decorah).  Two years later William was joined by his two younger brothers, Sam and Sylvester, and the business continued to grow and began to diversify their offerings. Over 150 years later, Cargill Incorporated now has operations spanning the globe with over 155,000 employees across 70 countries. They continue to pride themselves on remaining true to the vision of their founder: “helping farmers prosper, connecting markets and bringing consumers the products they’re seeking.” 

Long known as a merchant of commodities, the corporation has become one of the largest diversified service companies in the United States. In addition to merchandising crops, Cargill serves as a transporter of commodities; supplier of feed, seed, and other products to agricultural producers; processor of food ingredients (one of the main operations here in the Cedar Rapids area); manufacturer of industrial steel, salt, and other goods; and much more. 

At the end of April, Jordan Timm, Corporate Relations and Reunion Giving Specialist for Coe College, had the opportunity to sit down with two young Coe alumni, Ciera Menken ’16 and Thomas Tittle ’18, both of whom have transitioned into becoming full-time chemists for Cargill’s Cedar Rapids corn milling plant. 

For each of you, Cargill was your first job after graduation, was there anything that surprised you as you transitioned to the work world and started with the company?
Thomas Tittle: "One thing that really transferred over well were the lab skills that we learned. A lot of the basic stuff from our biology and chemistry labs helped to set us up with a strong foundation for what we do now. Nobody likes to wake up for 8 AM labs but it really does make a difference after graduation.”
Ciera Menken:  "The only other thing that I would add is, while there are some skills that you learn here that might not carry directly over to your job role, the biggest thing I think I took away from Coe was learning how to learn. That sounds confusing but there are a lot of times that we are shown new things and then we need to be able to troubleshoot and learn from it. They are really looking for somebody with the capacity to figure things out. They will teach you a lot of what you need to know but you need to have the right mindset to take it in and learn from it. Also you write a lot fewer lab reports but standard operating procedures (which I know Marty goes over) are very important."
 

To read the full interview, click here.