Faculty


Sara Farrell

Sara Farrell

Co-Coordinator of Gender Studies Program 

B.A., Psychology, University of Iowa
M.A., Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Minnesota State University, Mankato
Ph.D., Social and Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Northern Illinois University

"Gender shapes the way that each of us experiences, and reacts in, the world. I study gender issues because I can't resist - regardless of the research question, I typically find myself wondering how gender, and especially how stereotyped expectations about gender, might impact the answer. In particular, I am interested in how our interactions with and judgments about others are influenced by beliefs about gender. Asking and answering questions about gender and gender stereotypes can lead to some interesting discussions, a heightened self-awareness and development, and the ability to more effectively appreciate, empower, interact with, and lead others."


Joyce Janca-Aji

Joyce Janca-Aji

Co-Coordinator of Gender Studies Program 

M.A., French Literature, Indiana University
Ph.D., French Literature, Indiana University

"When I was about 10 or 11, it felt to me as though I had a male brain and a female body. As an incessant reader, the "I" or voice of the narratives I read, and identified with, always seemed masculine to me. And I was indignant when women were sidekicks and heroines in their own right. So early in my literary career, I decided to focus on writings by or about women....which naturally led me to a deep and abiding interest in gender studies."


John Chaimov

John Chaimov 

B.A., German Literature, University of California
M.A., Comparative Studies in Literature, University of Chicago
Ph.D., Comparative Studies in Literature, University of Chicago

"I love teaching about and learning about gender because it's something all of us live on a day-to-day basis but rarely think about. We think everywhere must be like here. Well, I recently spent time in Thailand, where you end every sentence with a little word that declares your gender. That makes a skit like "It's Pat" from Saturday Night Live pretty much impossible, but it also gives you the control to use everyday language to declare who you are. It's those sorts of different ways of being that studying gender opens your eyes to."

 


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Susanne Gubanc 

B.A., Mass Communication, University of Illinois, Springfield
M.A., Mass Communication, Miami University, Ohio
M.A., Women's Studies, York University, England


Gina Hausknecht

Gina Hausknecht 

B.A., English, Oberlin College
M.A., English, University of Michigan
Ph.D., English, University of Michigan

"My interest in gender studies emerged from my training in literary analysis and the examination of intersections of literature and culture. Human cultures are saturated in ideas, values, beliefs, and myths about gender, although often in ways that are invisible to us. Gender studies provides a lens on the world around us; it asks us to think about how we construct people as male and female and what associations and assumptions go along with those constructions."


Jeffrey Hoover

Jeffrey Hoover 

B.A., Eastern Mennonite College 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Notre Dame


Andrea Kann

Andrea Kann 

B.A., Amherst College 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa


Nicholas Mason-Browne

Nicholas Mason-Browne 

B.A., Spanish, University of British Columbia
B.A., Anthropology, University of British Columbia
M.A., Spanish, University of Iowa
M.A., Library Science, University of Iowa
Ph.D., Spanish, University of Iowa

"Teaching Gender Studies is a very rewarding experience. Students are, by and large, genuinely and enthusiastically interested in gender-related issues (especially relationships). They are always eager, in my experience, to discuss and explore the course material; and they always manage to do so in a way that is both enlivening and positive. As an academic subject, Gender Studies gives us a more profound and complete understanding of our innermost selves, of our essential beliefs and patterns of behavior; and it fosters a more tolerant view of others. Therein lies its particular value and importance."


Melissa Sodeman

Melissa Sodeman 

B.A. University of Washington, Seattle 
M.A. Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles