The Evolution of 1960s Rock 'n' Roll:
A Closer Look at Bob Dylan, The Beatles, and The Rolling Stones

April 7, 14, 21, 28

The Thursday Forum calendar closes with a series focusing on the changes, evolution, invention and re-invention of rock 'n' roll as heard in the 1960s music of Bob Dylan, the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. Music professors Marc Falk and Steve Shanley begin by tracing the roots of early rock, and then look at these three artists as they influenced one another both musically and culturally.

Participants will then take a more in-depth look at critical albums from each artist. We'll examine Dylan's role as a catalyst for social change, and his musical shift from a purer folk to "folk-rock" and beyond, with an emphasis on his albums "Highway 61 Revisited" (1965) and "Blonde on Blonde" (1966).

The Beatles' session will focus on their 1967 classic "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" and how they got there with "Rubber Soul" (1965) and "Revolver" (1966), and where they went from there.

Finally, the Rolling Stones played a pivotal role in the 1960s as standard bearers for R & B and the blues, and musical forefathers of any number of rebellious rock 'n' roll styles. We'll take a closer look at the Beatles/Stones split, and a deeper listen to their late 1960s albums "Beggars Banquet" (1968) and "Let It Bleed" (1969).

Marc Falk
Marc Falk
Pearl M. Taylor Associate Professor of Music

Steve Shanley
Steve Shanley
Assistant Professor of Music